Verbs followed by verb + ing (Part 1)



When we use a verb after the following verbs, we usually use verb + ing:

1) admit + verb + ing

The accused man admitted killing 3 people.
The accused man admitted kill 3 people. X
The accused man admitted to kill 3 people. X

Mary admitted making a mistake.
Mary admitted make a mistake. X
Mary admitted to make a mistake. X

Even though John was clearly innocent, he admitted driving the car in order to protect his best friend.
Even though John was clearly innocent, he admitted drive the car in order to protect his best friend. X
Even though John was clearly innocent, he admitted to drive the car in order to protect his best friend. X

Suzy admitted using her mobile phone during the exam.
Suzy admitted use her mobile phone during the exam. X
Suzy admitted to use her mobile phone during the exam. X

2) adore + verb +ing

I adore kissing my wife.
I adore kiss my wife. X
I adore to kiss my wife. X

Max adores curling up in bed with a good book.
Max adores curl up in bed with a good book. X
Max adores to curl up in bed with a good book. X

John adores playing dodgeball with his friends.
John adores play dodgeball with his friends. X
John adores to play dodgeball with his friends. X

He adored watching cartoons when he was a child.
He adored watch cartoons when he was a child. X
He adored to watch cartoons when he was a child. X

3) avoid + verb + ing

I avoided telling him the truth because I knew it would upset him.
I avoided tell him the truth because I knew it would upset him. X
I avoided to tell him the truth because I knew it would upset him. X

Mary avoids eating unhealthy food.
Mary avoids eat unhealthy food. X
Mary avoids to eat unhealthy food. X

You should avoid going to the beach during the summer holidays.
You should avoid go to the beach during the summer holidays. X
You should avoid to go to the beach during the summer holidays. X

Tom avoided writing a letter to Mary and chose to speak to her instead.
Tom avoided write a letter to Mary and chose to speak to her instead. X
Tom avoided to write a letter to Mary and chose to speak to her instead. X

4) can't stand + verb + ing

I can't stand listening to the child's crying.
I can't stand listen to the child's crying. X
I can't stand to listen to the child's crying. X

Helen can't stand watching her best friend make the biggest mistake of her life.
Helen can't stand watch her best friend make the biggest mistake of her life. X
Helen can't stand to watch her best friend make the biggest mistake of her life. X

Thomas can't stand being alone on weekends.
Thomas can't stand be alone on weekends. X
Thomas can't stand to be alone on weekends. X

They can't stand eating their mother's horrible cooking.
They can't stand eat their mother's horrible cooking. X
They can't stand to eat their mother's horrible cooking. X

5) carry on + verb + ing

The students carried on chatting even though the teacher had already arrived.
The students carried on chat even though the teacher had already arrived. X
The students carried on to chat even though the teacher had already arrived. X

Matthew carried on playing his guitar despite the noise from the TV.
Matthew carried on play his guitar despite the noise from the TV. X
Matthew carried on to play his guitar despite the noise from the TV. X

Elizabeth and her friends carried on walking despite being tired.
Elizabeth and her friends carried on walk despite being tired. X
Elizabeth and her friends carried on to walk despite being tired. X

He has carried on supporting the charity even though he recently lost his job.
He has carried on support the charity even though he recently lost his job. X
He has carried on to support the charity even though he recently lost his job. X

6) consider + verb + ing

He's considering writing a romance novel.
He's considering write a romance novel. X
He's considering to write a romance novel. X

Max and Mona are considering buying a house together.
Max and Mona are considering buy a house together. X
Max and Mona are considering to buy a house together. X

John considered getting married to his longtime girlfriend.
John considered get married to his longtime girlfriend. X
John considered to get married to his longtime girlfriend. X

We are considering getting a loan to cover our debts. 
We are considering get a loan to cover our debts. X
We are considering to get a loan to cover our debts. X

Lesson Vocabulary

innocent (adjective) = A person who has not done something wrong or illegal is innocent. 

admit (verb) = to say that is something is true even if you don't want to

can't stand = hate

carry on (phrasal verb) = continue

consider (verb) = think about

dodgeball (noun)

cartoon (noun) - The Flintstones is a well-known cartoon.

guitar (noun)

cry (verb) - The actor is crying. 


Exercise

Your turn! Can you spot and correct the mistakes in the mistakes in the following sentences?

1) I admitted to sing loudly during the lesson.
2) They adore to kissing their children. 
3) We considered go to Italy for our next holiday.
4) She can't to stand seeing animals animals in pain.

Please leave your answers in the comments section and I will gladly give you some feedback. 

Giving Advice



In today's free English lesson, we look at different ways to give advice in English. 

1) Should

The most common way to give advice is to use 'should'. 'Should' is a true modal helping verb so it is always followed by the base form of the verb and stays the same for all persons.

Johnny: I don't feel very well.
Suzy: You should go see the doctor. 

Max: My brother can't find a job. 
Tom: He should apply at my company. We have a lot of vacancies at the moment. 

Robert: My wife is bored at home. What do you think I should do?
Lucy: You should tell her to get a hobby or a job. 

Chris: You shouldn't eat a lot of sweet food. It's bad for your health. 
John: I don't eat a lot of sweet food. My problem is bread. I know I shouldn't eat a lot bread, but I just can't help myself.

2) Had Better

We can also use 'had better' to give advice. Both 'had better' and 'had better not' are followed by the base form of the verb and stay the same for all persons. We usually use these forms when we speak. We also prefer to use the contracted form.

Tommy: My new TV doesn't work.
John: You'd better take it back to the shop so that it can be repaired.
Sarah: It looks like Max broke his leg. 
Suzy: We'd better take him to the hospital ASAP.

Kevin: My sister is furious with me. 
Chad: You'd better not talk to her for the rest of the day.

Bridget: That girl is so rude to the teachers.
Chandler: She'd better watch out for Mr. Hendel. He doesn't stand for that sort of behaviour. 

3) If I were you...

We also use the second conditional when giving advice. We often use this in spoken English. 

If I were ..., I would....
If I were ...., I would not...

I would (and the contraction I'd) is followed by the base form of the verb. I would not (and the contraction I wouldn't) is also followed by the base form of the verb.

Nicole: I can't make out the words. The letters are too small. 
Sammy: If I were you, I'd go see an optician. 

Cate: John just called to say he can't find his mobile phone.
Meryl: If I were him, I'd look in the bathroom. He's always leaving it there. 

Lemon: Helen is not sure if she should get married to Mark.
Mary: If I were her, I wouldn't do that! Mark doesn't seem like a faithful person.

Philip: My children are not happy with their new Maths teacher. 
Mary: If I were them, I would try to get along with her. She's new, but she's a very good teacher. 

4) Ought

We can use 'ought' to give advice. You can see more information about that in my lesson on 'ought'.

Lesson Vocabulary

apply (verb) = to request something officially e.g. apply for gym membership, apply for a job, apply for sick leave, etc. It usually means that you have to write a letter or complete a form in order to request something.

vacancy (noun) = a job opening i.e. a job that is available for someone to do

ASAP (acronym) = as soon as possible 

optician (noun - UK) / optometrist (noun - US) 

bathroom (compound noun)
Exercise

Your turn! Try and give advice for the following problems using the structures from the lesson:

1) Max is overweight.
2) Suzy has the flu.
3) They are cold. 
4) The washing machine is broken. 

Please leave your answer in the comments section and I will gladly give you some feedback. 

Noun suffixes



What is a suffix?

A suffix is a group of letters that we put after a word to make a new word. 

The different noun suffixes

1) -sion

We use -sion to make nouns from certain verbs:

televise (verb) - television (noun)

The event was televised to the whole world.
It is becoming more common to see smart televisions.

revise (verb) - revision (noun)

I don't like revising for the exam, but unfortunately it is necessary.
Some students leave their revision until it is too late.

supervise (verb) - supervision (noun)

The teacher is supervising the students.
Some supervision is needed if you want the workers to finish the prototype in time for the launch.

2) -tion

We also use -tion to make nouns from certain verbs:

repeat (verb) - repetition (noun)

Would you mind repeating the directions?
There are people who believe that the secret to language learning lies in repetition.

relax (verb) - relaxation (noun)

You need to learn to relax!
My idea of relaxation is being waited on hand and foot.

separate (verb) - separation (noun)

You should separate the papers into two piles.
It is difficult for couples to endure separation.

3) -ment

We also use -ment to make nouns from certain verbs and adjectives:

improve (verb) - improvement (noun)

What are you doing to improve your English?
The boy has shown slow but consistent improvement since he joined the class at the beginning of the year.

govern (verb) - government (noun)

Do you think it is easy to govern a country?
I don't think our government is doing everything in its power to look after us.

merry (adjective) - merriment (noun)

Mary was a merry girl until her mother passed away.
These workers lead stressful lives; they need some good merriment every now and then.

5) -ness

We use -ness to make nouns from certain adjectives:

happy (adjective) - happiness (noun)

Are you happy?
The key to happiness is doing as little as possible.

lazy (adjective) - laziness (noun)

Max is an extremely lazy man.
The girl's laziness is driving me crazy!

sad (adjective) - sadness (noun)

How can one comfort a sad person?
I can see the sadness in their eyes.

6) -ity

We use -ity to make nouns from certain adjectives:

impossible (adjective) - impossibility (noun)

It is impossible for any person to be in two places at once.
The impossibility of the situation was too much to bear.

real (adjective) - reality (noun)

This coat is made of real fur.
It is time for the couple to face reality.

insane (adjective) - insanity (noun)

I think people who go cage diving are insane.
Lucy couldn't understand what all the insanity was about.

7) -ence / -ance

We use both -ence and -ance to make nouns from certain adjectives and verbs:

important (adjective) - importance (noun)

It is important to take your passport when you go to the airport.
The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde.

insistent (adjective) - insistence (noun)

The president is insistent that his government is doing everything it can to resolve the issue peacefully.
I went to the office party at my manager's insistence.

disappear (verb) - disappearance (noun)

The girl disappeared on her way to school.
The parents couldn't handle their son's disappearance.

8) -ship

We -ship to make nouns from certain other nouns:

friend (noun) - friendship (noun)

Max doesn't make friends very easily.
How do you know when a friendship is real?

intern (noun) - internship (noun)

The intern couldn't figure out what was wrong with the patient.
His internship lasted longer than that of his colleagues.

member (noun) - membership (noun)

He is a member of the local golf club.
His gym membership will expire in 2 weeks.

Lesson Vocabulary

prototype (noun) = the first example of product that is used as a basis to develop future products

being waited on hand and foot (idiom) = to have everything done for you instead of doing it for yourself

passed away (phrasal verb) = a polite way to say that someone has died

intern (noun) = a doctor who works in a hospital, but is still being trained

smart TV / connected TV / hybrid TV

There are 2 piles of documents on the man's desk.

This coat is made of fur. 


Exercise

Your turn! What suffixes do we use with following words to make them into nouns:

1) hilarious (2) revered (3) awful (4) create (5) similar (6) involve (7) tense (8) ail

Please leave your answers in the comment section and I will gladly give you some feedback. Good luck!